The virus is spread by inhalation in a majority of instances. Visors stop large droplets, masks stop smaller droplets and masks such as 3M 1863 stop the virus PROVIDED you have had a test that shows the mask fits correctly

https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/map.html

COVID - 19

For an up-to-date picture of the current situation this web-site remains sound.

https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2
https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator/

This is the WHO formula for making your own hand sanitiser

The best way to think about safety is to manage risk. You will never eliminate the chance of being infected but you can minimise it. Some thoughts:

1 Get the vaccine, whichever one you get offered/can access. This protects you from severe disease but does not necessarily stop you being able to transmit the virus.


2 The chances and severity of contraction are linked to virus load and time of exposure. It is worst if you are exposed to a high load for a short time or low load for a long time. 

3 Very few cases are contracted outdoors simply because spacing is usually better and there is fresh air circulating to decrease any viral exposure

4 The worst scenario is a small enclosed space with recirculating air (air-conditioning not taking in fresh air for example)

5 Vitamin D may help prevent/fight early infection and supplements very unlikely to do any harm hence taking supplements probably not a bad idea.. 

6 It does seem you are able to get the disease twice but this remains fortunately rare.

7 A very good article in JAMA 6 May 2020 doi: 10.1001/jama.2020.8259 outlines the current tests for COVID. The most widely used test is to detect viral RNA using an RT-PCR test. In most folk the virus becomes detectable on day1 of infection peaking at the first week and declining by week 3. The test detects the virus in 63% of those known to have infection using nasal swabs. Thus testing is limited by both timing and the sensitivity of the test. Antibodies begin to increase the second week following onset of symptoms IgM is gone by 5 weeks but IgG may persist beyond 7 weeks. Both tests are pretty specific, in other words if they are positive you have had it but they can miss folk who have or have had it. 

8 The response to viral infection is both humeral and cell mediated and most of the work and concentration has been measuring humoral response so have caution in interpreting progress based on this alone.

This simulator shows why self-isolation is effective............stick with it to the end!

The virus is quite easily killed by most disinfectants. This reference gives the effectivity
AS LONG AS YOU GIVE THE CHEMICAL A FEW MINUTES TO WORK 


MSc MD FRCOphth​​ FWACS MBE

​Glaucoma Consultant Surgeon

Moorfields, London




It is possible to catch the virus by putting your hands up to your face/mouth after touching a contaminated surface.. The virus survives on various surfaces for different periods of time